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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
, they used to throw everybody out of the room, and get it done. what worries me about the boehner/obama relationship, it seems like it's almost nonexistent. they can't even shake hands at a party, for goodness sake. >> and in many ways, i blame the republicans for not coming up with a real deal, not recognizing what the voters did. at the same time, i think obama has been very, very poor at applying the personal charm and chemistry that the president can. dragging people off to camp david. and we don't know whether or not that would work. but he hasn't tried it. and when a government budget is at stake -- >> larry, they did feel offended by president obama's last offer. they felt it was so outrageous. >> it was outrageous. it was double what they saw last year. it had spending increases, rather than spending cuts. and it wanted to have congress lose its role, in term terms of increasing the debt ceiling. none of that's probably going to happen. and i think to nick's point, it's a good point. if you go back and look. i worked for reagan years ago. reagan and tip o'neill would sit and wor
start with you, frank, before john boehner rejected out of hand president obama's attempt to try and do a fiscal cliff deal? >> with $1.6 trillion in new taxes, i think probably half a second. >> when you see the apparent attempt at a bipartisan lunch going on today between obama and romney, it was all very sweet and everything, the reality is the picture was about as uncomfortable as the relationship is between the two sides, and again, frank, how do we get to a better place in washington? how do we get these guys to realize, let me throw this at you. i interviewed mike tyson an hour ago. fantastic interview in many ways. what i found really fascinating and relevant to this, he talks about when he goes back to the streets he grew up in in new york, what real people care about. they care about their homes, they care about their jobs, they care about feeding their children. he got quite passionate about it. i just don't get that these politicians squabbling in d.c. care about those things enough or they would stop this politicking over things like a fiscal cliff. what do you think, frank
the advisors out and get stuff done. i just can't imagine that happening with barack obama and john boehner. they just seem complete polar opposites. >> as you suggested, obama doesn't really have an appetite for this sort of thing. we saw that last time around and if you read bob woodward's "the price of politics" it's one of the themes that comes through loud and clear. he's doing some things differently this time, though and one thing that i think is very interesting, he's taking his case to the american people and doing it day after day. all of us have talked on this show and other places about how bad the president has been in the past on selling what he wants to happen, on explaining his policies and really bringing people around to them. and we see him now trying to do that in a more forceful way than he's done in the past. and that may strengthen his hand further. >> also, do you think -- sorry. ross, do you think the deal in the end when it gets done, as it obviously will get done at some stage, do you think the republicans will by then, whether they want to or not, have moved on t
with ourselves. >> house speaker boehner saying that is president obama and the democrats to save you for being higher taxes. this fiscal cliff thing, the problem with the republicans, larry, is that they have been boxed in by the democrats into a difficult position where the polls confirm that the public in america believe that the reason that president obama is going to win the debate is because, come the fiscal cliff moment, that if he goes over, that they are going to save the backsides of the wealthy 2% of americans. i probably shouldn't but i do. >> speaking as a reagan conservative, i must say i rather agree with you. probably shouldn't. but i do. i think divided government is very difficult. and there's some principles that speaker boehner is fighting for, with which i actually agree. but i think politically, the risk here for the gop, is they've become the party of rich people. and they give up the middle-class to the democrats. and i think you saw some of that in the presidential election. i don't think that's their intent. i think their tax reform intent is quite sound. but the way t
problems it seems to me is the relationship between john boehner and barack obama. just seems deeply flawed. they're at a party and they couldn't be bothered to shake hands. this is not the kind of way that adults, politicians, behave, is it, in a civilized society. they should be able to shake hands, be friendly, then get behind closed doors, shout at each other and get a deal done. but these two, they don't seem to have any time for each other at all. that can't help the process. >> well, piers, i wouldn't read too much into the christmas party at the white house. as i think you know, there are long lines to get your pictures taken with the president. speaker boehner has had his picture with the president many times. the president has had his picture with speaker boehner. but look, the important thing as you say is to get everybody together. now, the president's plan is very clear. he spells out exactly how he's going to get the revenue and he's very detailed about the cuts. what we would like to see is a similarly detailed plan from speaker boehner. as the president said, when you look a
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)